Tag Archives: computer vision syndrome

EyeMist.com

9 Nov

EyeMist.com is an online resource for people suffering from Dry Eye, Computer Vision Syndrome, or Allergy Eye. It offers articles and research on treatment, and ways to identify the symptoms of Dry Eye, CVS, and Allergy Eye, as well as Blepharitis and LASIK Eye Surgery.

Healthy Vision: Tips For Preventing Computer Eye Strain From @TheLASIKDoc

17 Aug

RT @TheLASIKDoc Work at a #computer all day? Make sure that your time spent on the computer is not hurting your #vision:

Make sure that your time spent on the computer is not hurting your vision. Growing up in this day and age, it is becoming more and more common to include technology into our daily life and activities. For some, this could include talking away on your cell phone or Bluetooth to different people across the country. For others, it could mean reading your paperback book off of an iPad or Kindle, rather than carrying around an actual hard copy.” Read More

Computer Vision Syndrome and Computer Eye Strain

20 Apr

Benefits of Eye Misting for Computer Dry Eye

We know what you’re doing right now!

You’re looking at a computer screen, aren’t you?

And chances are, your eyes are not happy about it!

Computers and dry eye symptoms.

  • Dry eye discomfort from computer use is a growing and increasingly urgent problem.
  • Ophthalmologists call this “computer vision syndrome” (CVS), “computer eye strain,” “computer eye irritation” or “computer dry eye.”
  • The computer dry eye problem is widespread, and potentially serious.
  • Nearly every computer user experiences dry eye discomfort that could lead to loss of productivity, loss of income, and eventually, loss of eyesight

Do you have computer vision syndrome?

If you answer “yes” to question #1 and at least two others, you may be experiencing computer vision syndrome.

  • Are you a “Computer Nerd” who uses a computer more than two hours a day?
  • Do your eyes sometimes burn or itch?
  • Are your eyes sometimes sensitive to light?
  • Does your vision ever become blurry?
  • Do your eyelids sometimes become heavy or tired during computer use, even though you’ve had plenty of sleep?
  • Do you get headaches from using the computer?
  • Do your shoulders sometimes feel tight while using the computer?
  • Do you have frequent eye allergies?

Other causes of computer vision syndrome:

In addition to computers, several common office conditions could result in computer eye strain, tear film dehydration and dry eye symptoms.

  • Forced-air heating and cooling.
  • Synthetic chemicals (plastics, paint, cleaning fluids, etc).
  • Insulated windows and walls.
  • Fluorescent lighting.
  • Stress.
  • Low indoor humidity.
  • Your diet.

Your eyes depend on the tear film.

  • The highly complex “tear film” covering the eyes consist of water, oil, electrolyte, antibodies, protein and mucus. The tear film moistens, lubricates, oxygenates and protects the eyes; and forms a light transmitting surface that enables you to see.
  • The tear film is 98% water. Every time you open your eyelids, you expose the tear film to evaporation and natural water loss.
  • Dry eye symptoms occur when too much water evaporates from the tear film without replacement (this process is highly complex, also involving tear glands and brain messaging).
  • More dry eye education
  • More tear film education
  • Computers accelerate tear film dehydration and water evaporation because:
    • They create or reflect glare and intensely bright light.
    • They are almost always indoors, which tends to be less humid than outdoors.
    • They cause a decreased blink rate (blinking replenishes the tear film), which may drop from 30-40 times a minute to three times a minute.
    • They contribute to brain and body stress, which is dehydrating.
  • To re-hydrate dry eyes, simply add water to the dehydrated tear film!
    • Formulated eye drops are inconvenient to apply, excessively large in volume, contain little natural water and are not always effective.
    • Nature’s Tears EyeMist instantly and conveniently replaces lost tear film water.

Nature’s Tears EyeMist.

To supplement tear film water and minimize dry eye symptoms, mist your eyes frequently with Nature’s Tears EyeMist. With no dosage limit, all-natural Nature’s Tears EyeMist may be applied whenever computer dry eye symptoms are experienced. Always keep Nature’s Tears EyeMist beside your computer (and combine it with a complete daily hydration program that includes drinking 8-10 glasses of water a day).

Computer vision syndrome prevention tips:

  • An eye care professional may prescribe special “computer glasses.”
  • Keep a glass of water (And Nature’s Tears EyeMist) near your desk to help humidify the air.
  • Drink bottled water while you work…but pour it into a glass first. Total daily water intake should be at least 8 to 10 glasses.
  • Make a conscious effort to blink more often.
  • Several times per hour, look around the room at objects of varying distances.
  • Take scheduled breaks away from your desk (outdoors if possible).
  • To reduce glare, position your computer so windows are at the side of your computer rather than in the front or back. Adjust window blinds accordingly.
  • If possible, turn off fluorescent overhead lights and switch to a desk lamp.
  • Attach a glare-blocking hood or filter to your monitor.
  • Crack a window to let in humid air from the outside. Outdoor air is free of re-circulated bacteria and shed skin particles from co-workers, which enters via the heating/cooling system and can cause eye and skin dehydration.
  • Set the REFRESH RATE on your monitor as high as you can (over 85). Use a flat-screen if possible. A low refresh rate (60 or less), on a cathode ray monitor, can cause dry eye, eye strain and headache.
  • Take a shower every day that allow plenty of steam and water to penetrate your eyes, skin, breathing passages and lungs.
  • Every couple weeks, take a long, luxuriant hot body bath with a cup of Epsom salt dissolved in the bathtub water. This will detoxify, lubricate and humidify dry eyes and skin, improve skin flexibility and benefit all part of the body.
  • Keep your body fit: Reduce stress, establish a daily program of sleep, fresh air and exercise, control your weight, avoid sugar (which is dehydrating) and eat lots of dark green leafy vegetables (eye food).

Tips to Prevent Computer Eye Strain and Computer Dry Eye

6 Apr

Since March, 2007, the Sharon Kleyne Hour Power of Water radio talk show has interviewed numerous guests who offered tips to prevent “computer eye strain” (also called “computer vision syndrome,” “CVS,” or computer eye strain). Symptoms are experienced by a surprisingly large percentage of people who work at computers.

Computer eye strain and dry eye symptoms should never be ignored. Dry eye symptoms could lead to chronic dry eye, eyelid inflammation, corneal ulceration, impaired vision and numerous eye diseases. Symptoms include red, burning and itchy eyes, blurred vision, eye twitching, headaches and impaired sleep.

Vision care experts agree that the #1 tip to prevent or minimize computer eye strain is educating yourself about the problem. The #2 tip is taking personal responsibility to proactively implement the eye care tips described below.

The #3 tip for keeping eyes all-naturally wet, moist and humid is to always have Nature’s Tears® EyeMist® near your computer. Apply as often as desired without the inconvenience of eye drops (Eye drops, applied too frequently, can flood and wash away the eye’s natural tear film. See http://www.naturestears.com and click on “Dry Eye”). Nature’s Tears EyeMist, a personal hand-held eye humidifying device, is all-natural tissue culture water, pH balanced and 100% safe.

Tips to prevent and minimize computer eye strain.

In addition to preventing computer eye strain and dry eye, many of these tips help prevent other computer related conditions such as gout, allergies, carpal tunnel syndrome and weight gain (abdominal swelling).

  • Keep an all natural, 100% water eye mist beside your computer. Whenever you feel eye discomfort, mist the air in front of your eyes for two seconds. Sharon Kleyne recommends Nature’s Tears EyeMist for this, available on http://www.Amazon.com or http://www.naturestears.com.
  • Drink eight to ten glasses of water a day and drink water from a glass while you work.
  • Keep a bowl of water or a plant near your desk to humidify the air. Crack a window to let in fresh, humid air from the outdoors (forced-air heating and cooling re-circulates dehydrating bacteria and skin flora).
  • “Eye Healthy” diet choices include dark green leafy vegetables (spinach, kale, arugula, broccoli leaves), foods with omega-3 fatty acids (fish and flaxseed oil) and carrots.
  • While working, avoid dehydrating substances such as alcohol, coffee, energy drinks, refined sugar products and cigarette smoke.
  • Avoid staying up late at night on the computer if you will be working at a computer in the morning.
  • Several times per hour, to relax and exercise your eyes, look around the room at objects of varying distances. Take scheduled breaks away from your desk, outdoors if possible.
  • Make a conscious effort to maintain your blink rate (computer use can drop your reflexive blink rate from 30 to three times a minute). Tape the word “BLINK” on your monitor. The more you blink, the moister your eyes.
  • Position your chair as high as possible with respect to the monitor. The resultant lowering of eyelids can drastically reduce tear film moisture evaporation.
  • To reduce screen glare, position your computer so windows are at the sides rather than in front or back. Adjust window blinds so bright sunlight is away from screen and eyes. If possible, turn off fluorescent lights and use a less intense desk lamp.
  • An eye care professional may prescribe special “computer glasses” or, for severe dry eye, moisture retaining eyeglass lenses.
  • Wear sunglasses outdoors – solar radiation dehydrates the eyes.
  • If you have a cathode tube monitor, consider attaching a glare-blocking hood or filter to the screen and set the “Refresh Rate” as high as you can (over 85).
  • Take daily showers with plenty of steam and moisture penetrating eyes, skin and breathing passages. An occasional hot body bath with a cup of Epsom salt. Will benefit eyes and eyelids and reduces stress.
  • Avoid stress and get adequate sleep and fresh air exercise. Poor sleep and elevated stress can be dehydrating and cause dry eye symptoms.

Sharon Kleyne Hour Power of Water.

Listen to the Sharon Kleyne Hour Power of Water Mondays, 10 a.m., PST/PDT. The syndicated talk show is heard on Voice America/World Talk Radio, Green Talk Network and Apple iTunes. Go to http://www.SharonKleyneHour.com for podcasts of past shows or written summaries. Also visit http://www.naturestears.com, whatistheeye.wordpress.com, “Nature’s Tears EyeMist” on Facebook and “Bio-Logic Aqua” on Twitter. Sponsored by Nature’s Tears EyeMist.

© 2011 Bio-Logic Aqua Research

What is the Eye? Newsletter Issue #1

8 Aug

Everyone has an eye. Heck, some people even have two! We want to educate everyone about the importance of taking care of their eye(s). Why? Because that is how we see the world- through our eyes.

From our sister site, http://oneeyeatatime.tumblr.com. Take a peek!

USDA Food Pyramid Is Now “My Plate”

Healthy Eyes in Children – What to watch for and what to do.

Watery Eyes a Symptom of Dry Eyes

Computer Vision Syndrome and Computer Eye Strain

Preventing and Lessening Eye Injuries

13 Jun

Eye Protection and Emergency First Aid

Note: According to the Merriam-Webster Medical Dictionary (1995), “to injure” is defined as, “to impair the soundness of.” Based on this extremely broad definition, the term “eye injury,” as used by eye care and emergency professionals, can refer to conditions ranging from the mildly uncomfortable (soap in the eye or squinting due to air pollution) to catastrophic trauma (eye penetration by a foreign object).

Eyesight Threats.

” In an emergency, eyesight threats may arise from smoke, heat, dust, fumes, airborne chemicals and particles, perspiration into the tear film, tear gas and pepper spray, mechanical injuries and impact trauma from flying objects. Injuries from of these threats may often be prevented or lessened through good eye safety practices.

” Eyesight threats may also be present in non-emergency situations. They could be caused by cleaning fluid fumes, auto exhaust, slicing onions, prolonged computer use, perspiration into the tear film, an eyelash in the eye, home shop accidents, and even insulated windows and walls and forced-air heating and cooling (which can be dehydrating to the eye’s protective tear film). These injuries may also be prevented or mitigated with good eye safety practices.

” Unprotected exposure to these eyesight threats could result in consequences ranging from mild eye discomfort to serious and permanent eye damage. Symptoms could include blurred or impaired vision, pain, dehydration (dry eye), eye strain; burning, itchy or watery eyes; eye diseases and serious physical injury (catastrophic trauma). Symptoms may be mild (sub-acute) or temporarily disorienting, or they could result in permanent eye damage and eyesight impairment or loss.

Eye Protection and First Aid.

  • Remember that in an emergency such as a burning building, impaired eyesight from dust, smoke, fumes or perspiration, could make it more difficult or impossible to get out and could cost you your life.
  • Healthy, well hydrated eyes will serve you far better in an emergency. It pays to educate yourself about eye care and practice good eye health on a daily basis.
  • Before engaging in an activity where eye injuries could occur, always:
    • Know what to do in an emergency.
    • Have a predetermined emergency first aid plan for eye and other injuries.
    • Follow good safety precautions and procedures.
    • Have emergency first aid materials available.
  • The best way to prevent eye injuries, especially from foreign objects and harmful substances, is to wear protective eyewear when in high risk situations. If you have corrective lenses, you are less likely to have an accident if you wear them.
  • Chronically dehydrated eyes, which lack sufficient moisture (water) in the protective overlying tear film, are more susceptible to certain eye injuries than fully hydrated eyes.

Specific Situations.

Fumes, smoke, tear gas, pepper spray, airborne chemicals. These conditions can make it difficult or impossible to see in an emergency and may cause permanent damage. They can also create discomfort by altering the tear film’s pH (acidity/alkalinity), osmolarity (moisture attracting ability) and moisture content. Protective eyewear helps shield eyes from certain airborne irritants. Should discomfort become extreme, irrigate eyes with a sterile eye wash spray such as Bio Med Wash, other eye wash devices, or water from a plumbed eyewash station.

Chemical or thermal burns to eyes, eyelids or skin. Spray or irrigate eyes with copious amounts of water or liquid (Bio Med Wash spray, other eye wash devices or a plumbed eyewash station). Do not blot burned areas unless caused by a chemical, such as pepper spray or tear gas that will continue to burn unless removed. If injury is severe, bandage and seek immediate medical assistance. Keep burned areas moist by spraying with a water mist. (Note: Some chemical eye washes may compound the negative effect of harmful chemicals.)

Perspiration and sunburn. Solar exposure is dehydrating to both eyes and skin and could increase perspiration run-off into the eyes, thus increasing the tear film’s salt concentration and causing discomfort. Sunburn is extremely dehydrating to eyes, and to eyelid skin that protects the eyes. Drink plenty of water during extended solar exposure or during situations that make you perspire. Water with added salt is best (a Gatorade type drink). The amount of needed water increases with temperature and activity level, but eight glasses per day are recommended. Moisturize eyes and skin with a water eye and facial mist and by drinking plenty of water.

Foreign objects (catastrophic trauma). For small objects such as sand or metal filings, irrigate and flush the affected eye with copious amounts of water, from either an all-water eye spray, plumbed eyewash station or other eye wash system, until the object(s) is removed. If there is (or if you suspect) penetration, severe pain, profuse watering or corneal scratching, bandage the eye and seek medical attention. Do not try to wash out particles that have penetrated the corneal membrane.

Contact lenses. For most eye injuries, if there is a contact lens in the eye, leave it place while flushing, irrigating or bandaging. Remove the lens only when first aid treatment is completed and the eye begins to feel normal.

Eye strain, stress, fatigue and allergies can cause body, eyes and skin to lose moisture and cause eye discomfort. Moisturize the eyes with a water mist and by drinking plenty of water.

Low humidity, heat, cold and wind increase moisture evaporation from the body’s external surfaces (eyes, skin, breathing passages) causing skin chapping, eye discomfort, dry eye, etc. Low humidity may become an eye threat in both warm and cold weather. Moisturize the eyes with a water mist and by drinking plenty of water.

© 2011 Bio-Logic Aqua Research All Rights Reserved

USDA Food Pyramid Is Now “My Plate”

13 Jun

Still not a Single Glass of Water

“The health effects of dehydration in a changing environment are becoming pervasive. Dehydration diseases such as dry eye effects 50% of the population and are becoming a crisis. While I applaud the effort and intent of the national food chart, I am concerned that it does not recommend a single glass of water.”

Sharon Kleyne, syndicated radio talk show host*

On June 2, 2011, the United States Department of Agriculture published its newly revised nutritional “Food Pyramid” for 2011. The most noticeable difference from the old version is that it is no longer a pyramid (the Food Pyramid had been around since 1992). It is now called “My Plate” and it is essentially a pie chart (except that a dinner plate apparently works better for promoting a balanced diet that a pie).

Sharon Kleyne, founder of Bio-Logic Aqua Research and host of the Sharon Kleyne Hour – Power of Water syndicated radio talk show*, applauds the government’s attempt to improve our national eating habits. “In our society,” she says, “getting people to simply cut down on burgers, fried foods, donuts and soda pop, or to even be aware of what they eat, is a major accomplishment. People often don’t realize that what you eat affects who you are and every aspect of your life and health.

Mrs. Kleyne is concerned, however, that My Plate does not recommend water as part of a balanced diet. “Water is critical,” she explains. “Especially since an obese person’s body usually contains 30 to 40 percent less water per cubic inch than the body of a lean person. A diet with too little water can lead to poor health and numerous preventable dehydration diseases. Some dehydration diseases, such as dry eye, are rapidly becoming a global public health crisis.”

My Plate’s suggestions:

Although the My Plate chart tends to be fairly middle-of-the-road and basic, it is accompanied by a list of suggestions that, according to Sharon Kleyne, is basically sound:

  • Don’t overeat
  • Eat lots of fruits and vegetables.
  • Go easy on refined, bleached grains.
  • Avoid salt, sugar, grease and “empty calories.”

Sharon Kleyne’s additional suggestions:

Water: Water is the most fundamental of all nutrients and the basis for all life on Earth. Without water, food cannot be digested, processed or utilized.. The average American drinks far too little water and there is a major health impact as a result. Excess weight makes the problem much worse. Sharon Kleyne recommends drinking a minimum of six to eight glasses of room temperature water a day (This in addition to fluids such as juice, coffee, tea and soup. Sugar and carbonated drinks are dehydrating and not recommended).

Mrs. Kleyne offers a simple suggestion for My Plate: Place a glass of water on the diagram, alongside the recommended glass of milk.

Education: Learn all you can about nutrition and digestion/absorption (nutritious foods may not always be fully digested), and keep track of what goes into your body. Proper nutrition can save lives and also save billions of dollars (Fresh produce is the biggest bargain in the grocery store). .

Grains: My Plate’s Grain recommendation may be inflated, although it has dropped from 40% of the diet on the old Food Pyramid to 30% on My Plate. Most grain foods in the American diet contain empty calories and carbohydrates that should be eliminated or cut way back. On the other hand, grain foods that are not empty calories, such as wild rice, may be too nutritionally concentrated to be eaten in large quantities. The only grain foods that might reasonably constitute 30% of a diet are bran cereal and brown rice (although All-Bran, like wild rice and unlike bran flakes, is difficult to eat in large quantities).

Eat locally: Food is most beneficial when eaten in season and when grown near where you live. Sharon Kleyne applauds Walmart’s attempts to purchase fresh meat and produce locally whenever possible rather than importing them out of season from Mexico or Chile. This not only improves freshness and nutritional benefit, it saves on transportation costs.

Nutrition and Eyes: As an internationally recognized advocate for eye health and dry eye management, Sharon Kleyne reminds everyone that a daily diet should always include “eye foods” – dark green leafy vegetables (arugula, kale and/or spinach), carrots, omega-3 fatty acids, antioxidants and water! And don’t forget that sleep, exercise and stress reduction also benefit eye health and reduce dry eye symptoms.

***

*Don’t miss the Sharon Kleyne Hour – Power of Water Mondays at 10 a.m. PST/PDT. The syndicated show may be heard on Voice America/World Talk Radio, Green Talk Radio and Apple iTunes. Go to http://www.SharonKleyneHour.com for summaries and replays of past shows.

Sharon Kleyne Hour “Eye Care and Nutrition” links:

1. Food for the Eyes (Dr. Alan Taylor, Tufts University Laboratory for Nutrition and Vision Research – March 12, 2011):

http://www.naturestears.com/articles/article_Food_for_the_Eyes.php

2. Preventing Dry Eye (Dr. Philip Paden, Ophthalmologist – April 7, 2008; talks at length about eyesight and nutrition):

http://www.sharonkleynehour.com/Archive2008/Dry.Eye.Personal.Moisture.Supplementation.php