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Diagnose Dry Eye by zip code?

3 Apr

Mar 31

Diagnose by zip code? New study links weather, pollution to the disease:

Excerpt from AAO article:

“Residents of major cities with high levels of air pollution have an increased risk of dry eye syndrome, according to a study presented at the world’s largest ophthalmic conference, the 117th Annual Meeting of the American Academy of Ophthalmology, in New Orleans. Study subjects in and around Chicago and New York City were found to be three to four times more likely to be diagnosed with dry eye syndrome compared to less urban areas with relatively little air pollution. As a result of this study, researchers suggest that environmental manipulations should be considered as part of the overall control and management of patients with dry eye syndrome.”

Bikers Beware of Winter Eye Dangers

24 Feb

Sharon Kleyne and Philip Paden, MD, put together a list of recommendations for protecting against winter dry eye.

Paden is an ophthalmologist and a former instructor at Cornell University. He is also a former professional motorcycle racer who has been riding for 40 years and is an authority on motorcycle eye protection and motorcycle dry eye.

According to Kleyne and Paden, motorcycle dry eye primarily occurs when wind increases the pressure on water at or near the surface of the eyes and eyelids, to evaporate into the atmosphere. As a result of this moisture loss, riders frequently complain of eye irritation, discomfort or fatigue, blurred vision, watery eyes, headaches and feelings of stress. Sunglasses and face shields may not offer adequate eye protection because other dehydrating factors also play a role. The tear film that covers and protecting our eyes is 98% water.

Read more

EyeMist.com

9 Nov

EyeMist.com is an online resource for people suffering from Dry Eye, Computer Vision Syndrome, or Allergy Eye. It offers articles and research on treatment, and ways to identify the symptoms of Dry Eye, CVS, and Allergy Eye, as well as Blepharitis and LASIK Eye Surgery.

Allergy Eye Relief Education

1 Feb

The eye’s first line of defense against allergies is the complex and extremely thin tear film that covers the optical surface. Numerous environmental factors, from air pollution to air conditioning, can cause evaporation that result in slight, moderate or even severe tear film moisture loss (dehydration). This may be so slight that you don’t feel any symptoms. However, if you happen to be sensitive to allergens such as pollen, the allergic reaction will be more severe if your tear film is not functioning at full capacity. Bio Logic Aqua Technologies Biomedical Research Center has discovered that the best (and least expensive) way to mitigate the effect of allergens and other airborne irritants on the eyes is to pay attention to the health of your tear film.

An “allergy” may be defined as “an adverse immunological reaction to a substance that normally does not produce such a reaction.” Adverse reactions to things like pollen, mold spores and pet dander (called “allergens”), are an allergy because most people are not bothered by them. An adverse reaction to cigarette smoke or bee stings is not technically an allergy because nearly everybody reacts to them.

The typical allergic reaction produces symptoms in the eyes, breathing passages and skin. Some allergens only bother the eyes. This article will concern itself only with the effects of allergies on the eyes — even if the same allergy also affects other areas — and how to help defend the eyes not only against allergens but all airborne irritants.

It is common knowledge among specialists that allergy eye (especially pollen allergies) is worse in hot, dry weather and better in cool, humid weather. That is because many allergy eye symptoms result from dehydration of the tear film’s aqueous (water) layer, thereby creating an over-concentration of irritants and allergens. Reflex tearing tries to wash out these irritants and restore the tear film’s chemical and moisture balance. However, the reflex tears themselves may contain histamines and chemical imbalances.

Standard remedies such as eye drops and redness relievers may be ineffective against allergy eye because they can wash away the natural tear film, including the evaporation-slowing lipid layer. Chemicals in these products can create their own adverse reactions.

The best way to soothe allergy eye, and mitigate the effect of environmental challenges that dehydrate the tear film, is to emulate cool, humid weather by adding add pure, pH-balanced humidity to the air around the eyes. The humid mist will find its way into the tear film’s aqueous layer in just the right amount (two to five nanoliters) to help alleviate symptoms naturally and without harsh medicines, drops or chemical formulations.

Allergy Eye and Dry Eye Relief Education

7 Dec

Sharon Kleyne, Founder of Bio Logic Aqua Research, Discusses Allergy Eye Relief and Dry Eye

Sharon Kleyne, Founder of Bio Logic Aqua Research, on dry eye education, allergy relief, and tear film education.

Allergy Eye.

It is one of life’s paradoxes: Your eyes drive you crazy from itching due to spring or summer allergies. And yet-as you know all too well-the one thing you must not do is scratch or rub them.

This article will not tell you it is finally OK to scratch or rub itching eyeballs. That is irritating, inflammatory, and embeds the offending pollen and irritants in the cornea and conjunctiva. The article will, however, offer alternatives to scratching and present recently developed information about the condition known as “allergy eye.”

The Tear Film.

The eye’s first line of defense against allergies is the complex and extremely thin tear film that covers the optical surface. Numerous environmental factors, from air pollution to air conditioning, can cause evaporation that result in slight, moderate or even severe tear film moisture loss (dehydration). This may be so slight that you don’t feel any symptoms. However, if you happen to be sensitive to allergens such as pollen, the allergic reaction will be more severe if your tear film is not functioning at full capacity. Bio-Logic Aqua Technologies Biomedical Research has discovered that the best (and least expensive) way to mitigate the effect of allergens and other airborne irritants on the eyes is to pay attention to the health of your tear film.

What is an Allergy?

An “allergy” may be defined as “an adverse immunological reaction to a substance that normally does not produce such a reaction.” Adverse reactions to things like pollen, mold spores and pet dander (called “allergens”), are an allergy because most people are not bothered by them. An adverse reaction to cigarette smoke or bee stings is not technically an allergy because nearly everybody reacts to them.

The typical allergic reaction produces symptoms in the eyes, breathing passages and skin. Some allergens only bother the eyes. This article will concern itself only with the effects of allergies on the eyes — even if the same allergy also affects other areas — and how to help defend the eyes not only against allergens but all airborne irritants.

A New Discovery.

It is common knowledge among specialists that allergy eye (especially pollen allergies) is worse in hot, dry weather and better in cool, humid weather. That is because many allergy eye symptoms result from dehydration of the tear film’s aqueous (water) layer, thereby creating an over-concentration of irritants and allergens. Reflex tearing tries to wash out these irritants and restore the tear film’s chemical and moisture balance. However, the reflex tears themselves may contain histamines and chemical imbalances.

Standard remedies such as eye drops and redness relievers may be ineffective against allergy eye because they can wash away the natural tear film, including the evaporation-slowing lipid layer. Chemicals in these products can create their own adverse reactions.

The best way to soothe allergy eye, and mitigate the effect of environmental challenges that dehydrate the tear film, is to emulate cool, humid weather by adding add pure, pH-balanced humidity to the air around the eyes. The humid mist will find its way into the tear film’s aqueous layer in just the right amount (two to five nanoliters) to help alleviate symptoms naturally and without harsh medicines, drops or chemical formulations.

Symptoms and Relief of Allergy Eye

28 Jul

An “allergy” may be defined as “an adverse immunological reaction to a substance that normally does not produce such a reaction.” Adverse reactions to things like pollen, mold spores and pet dander (called “allergens”), are allergies because most people are not bothered by them. An adverse reaction to cigarette smoke or bee stings is not technically an allergy because nearly everybody reacts to them.

The eye’s first line of defense against allergies and other irritants is the complex and extremely thin tear film that covers the eyes’ exposed surface. The tear film is 99% water. The remainder of the tear film consists of salt, proteins, antibodies, lipids, etc.

Factors such as air pollution, dry air, heat, wind, forced air heating and cooling and even stress can cause your tear film to lose water. If you happen to be sensitive to allergens such as pollen, the reaction will be more severe if your tear film is too dry and not functioning at full capacity. It is common knowledge among specialists that allergy eye (especially pollen allergies) is worse in hot, dry weather and better in cool, humid weather when it is easier to maintain the tear film’s natural moisture balance.

Standard eye drops may be ineffective against allergy eye because the large drops can wash away the natural tear film, including the evaporation-slowing lipid layer. Also, chemicals in these products can create their own adverse or allergic reactions.

Allergy Eye and Dry Eye Symptoms.

Itching, redness, blurred vision, burning, eyelid swelling or redness, excessive tearing, grainy feeling, eye strain, fatigue, heavy eyelids,  and light sensitivity are some allergy eye and dry eye symptoms.

Reducing allergens/minimizing symptoms.

  • Stay indoors when the pollen count is at its peak, especially in mid-morning and early evening.
  • Keep windows closed and use air-conditioning during peak allergy seasons.
  • Wear glasses or sunglasses outdoors during peak seasons.
  • Allergy-proof your home; put dust-mite-proof covers on bedding and pillows; clean surfaces with a damp mop, rag, or shampooer rather than dry sweeping or dusting.
  • Keep pets outdoors as much as possible if you have pet allergies.
  • Reduce molds by keeping indoor humidity moderate. Shoot for 40% to 50% relative humidity at 70 degrees.
  • Remove contact lenses as soon as symptoms appear.

Standard remedies.

  • Cold compresses on the eyes.
  • Oral antihistamines (may cause drowsiness).
  • Eye drops and redness relievers.
  • See your doctor about mast cell stabilizers, non-steroidal anti-inflammatories and immunotherapy.

Maintaining tear film health.

  • Put bowls of water in your house, especially when heater or air conditioner is on.
  • Take frequent long, luxuriant baths and/or showers.
  • Let as much fresh air into the house as you can, especially the bathroom.
  • Apply a pure-water mist before and after facial cleansing and any time eyes or face feel dry and/or uncomfortable.

© 2010 Bio-Logic Aqua Research

Dog Dry Eye

15 Jun

Be Alert for Pet Dry Eye and Be Sure Your Dog or Cat Drinks Enough Water

“Dry eye in humans is often environmentally related and has become the number one reason for United States eye doctor visits. Pets are subject to the same environmental conditions and are far more prone to eye injuries and diseases, including cat and dog dry eye. As a pet “parent,” monitoring your dog or cat’s eye health is critical. Eyes should always be kept moist and, of course, you must make sure your dog or cat eats properly and drinks enough water.”

Sharon Kleyne, syndicated radio talk show host*

The state of eye care in pets.

According to Animal Eye Care, which runs 39 ophthalmology clinics for pets, dogs and cats are subject to numerous eye diseases. The list on their website includes blepharitis, eye injuries, cataracts, conjunctivitis, corneal ulcers, eyelid masses and glaucoma.

Sharon Kleyne, entrepreneur, water and health advocate, and host of the Sharon Kleyne Hour -Power of Water syndicated radio talk show, points out that nearly all of these eye diseases are either the result of pet dry eye (a disease characterized by insufficient water content in the protective natural tear film covering the eye), or have pet dry eye as a side effect (Pet dry eye often results from diet and/or medication).

She reiterates what many veterinarians are discovering – that treatment of these diseases will be far more effective if you simultaneously treat for cat or dog dry eye.

Cat and dog dry eye.

Sharon Kleyne’s research has discovered that eye dehydration and dry eye disease among humans are more widespread than commonly reported (nearly every human suffers from occasional dry eye symptoms and it usually goes undiagnosed). “If dry eye is under-diagnosed among humans,” says Mrs. Kleyne, “the condition is almost unrecognized among professional pet care experts – despite the fact that the incidence of dry eye may be even greater among dogs and cats than among humans.”

“The good news,” according to Mrs. Kleyne, “is that there are many ways pet owners can be proactive in monitoring their pet’s eyes to keep them hydrated and healthy.

(Note: Because of the “third eyelid” membrane, a normal dog or cat eye is slightly better protected and better moisturized than a human eye. But because pets are exposed to far more high risk situations, their eyes are more subject to injuries and infections.)

Dry eye symptoms

Pet dry eye in is closely linked to conjunctivitis, red eye, blepharitis (eyelid inflammation) and corneal ulcers. Symptoms may include: (1) redness of the white part of the eye, (2) eyelid inflammation, (3) frequent eye infections and dripping, (4) lack of “shine” in the eyes or a noticeable thickening or unevenness of the tear film’s usually invisible lipid (oil) component, (5) indications of eye discomfort such as frequent squinting, blinking or pawing at the eyes, (6) unusual dryness of the fur and/or mouth.

Environmental risk factors include; (1) living in an extremely dry or desert climate, (2) frequent exposure to wind, cold and solar radiation, (3) frequent exposure to dirt (very common among dogs), dust, smoke or chemical fumes, (4) prolonged exposure to climate controlled indoor environments such as forced-air heating and cooling and insulated walls and windows.

High risk dog breeds: bulldogs, cocker spaniels, lhasa apsos and west highland white terriers.

 

Suggestions for pet eye care, including cat and dog dry eye.

  • Control exposure to high risk situations.
  • Inspect your pet’s eyes frequently, watching for symptoms described above and for symptoms of other eye diseases.
  • See your veterinarian if your pet shown any symptoms of any eye disease, including dry eye.
  • For mostly indoor pets, make sure their home is well-humidified. Open windows, have lots of plants around, set out bowls of water or purchase a room humidifier.
  • Make sure your pet is well nourished and drinks enough water every day.
  • Apply Nature’s Tears EyeMist several times a day to maintain natural tear film water content and also to keep fur well hydrated. This routine can prevent or alleviate dry eye and help reduce dry eye as a side effect of other diseases.

Suggestions for pet watering.

Pets vary in the amount of water they like to drink and getting them to drink more can be a challenge. Do not assume that they will drink the exact right amount of water “by instinct.”

  • Pets should drink one cup of water per day for every 10 pounds of weight.
  • Follow the recommended diet for your pet’s species, age, weight, state of health and lifestyle.
  • Water sitting in a bowl all day can become contaminated and also lose oxygen and therefore taste.
  • Change water bowl frequently or purchase a pet watering device.
  • Don’t let pets drink from puddles or lakes.
  • Add water to your pet’s food.
  • Offer them water occasionally – especially after activity.
  • Pets require more water if they are ill.

*Don’t miss the Sharon Kleyne Hour – Power of Water Mondays at 10 a.m. PST/PDT. The syndicated show may be heard on Voice America/World Talk Radio, Green Talk Radio and Apple iTunes. Go to http://www.SharonKleyneHour.com for summaries and replays of past shows.

Online Sources:

WebMD for pets, PetMD, Animal Eye Care, Free Drinking Water, eHow, Hugs Pet Products..

© 2011 Bio-Logic Aqua Research All Rights Reserved