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Sharon Kleyne’s Advice For Motorists With Dry Eye Symptoms

26 Oct

Water Life Science® Creator Kleyne Warns Dry Eye Drivers. Sharon Kleyne Says Do Not Use Eye Drops & Drive.

You see it every day. While you’re driving or riding as a passenger, you glance over and observe the driver in the car next to you tilting his head back and administering eye drops. Of course, you know and he knows that it’s not the safest thing to do when you’re behind the wheel of a moving vehicle, yet people put themselves at risk every day in many ways.

Sharon Kleyne, host of the nationally syndicated The Sharon Kleyne Hour Power of Water, Global Climate Change and Your Health on VoiceAmerica sponsored by Nature’s Tears® EyeMist®, knows that millions of people suffer from the symptoms of dry eye disease. While fighting traffic and anxiety, many drivers find that they have to deal with, or try to ignore, eyes that itch, burn, blur and ache. “It’s a recipe for health and traffic disaster,” said Kleyne, who wants people to learn more about their eye condition and what they can do better to avoid a tragedy on a neighborhood street or highway.

Kleyne is a tireless spokesperson for eye and skin safety and she is committed to doing all that she can to abolish the dangerous problem of people applying eye drops to their eyes while they’re driving. Kleyne knows that dry eye disease is not just an irritant or a mild inconvenience. Dry eye disease can lead to blindness. In some circumstances, dry eye disease is a killer. But what exactly brings this dry eye condition on?

Kleyne, international Water Life Science® creator and the founder of Bio-Logic Aqua® Research Water Life Science®, teaches people to study the eye itself. She described how the eye’s delicate tear film is a complex, three-layered structure covering the eye’s surface. One’s vision depends on this tear film, and it is 99% water. “When the tear film’s middle (or aqueous) layer loses moisture (water) due to evaporation,” Kleyne said, “dry eye discomfort is often the result.” Kleyne explained how chemical eye drops can flood the natural tear film and wash away the aqueous layer’s remaining water, lipids, proteins, electrolytes and antibodies. A unique product that replenishes the evaporated moisture of the tear film and soothes dry eye symptoms is Nature’s Tears® EyeMist®.

Nature’s Tears® EyeMist® contains 100 percent Trade Secret tissue culture grade fresh water and no additives. It is applied to the eyes as a patented micron-size mist by a personal, portable hand-held humidifier. Nature’s Tears® EyeMist® is endorsed by more than 22,000 ophthalmologists and optometrists nationwide and was successfully market-tested in more than 70,000 outlets.

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Have you ever tried Nature’s Tears® EyeMist® or known someone who has done so to hydrate the eyes and skin? Have you tried it when you drive? What’s the verdict? We would enjoy your reactions and stories.

If you have a comment about this story or have stories you’d like to share, why not get involved? We’d like very much to hear from you! You can reach us in the following ways. Sharon@biologicaquaresearch.com 800-367-6478 ~ Fax 541-474-2123 http://www.naturestears.com or on Twitter at @sharonkleynehr

Please visit http://www.biologicaqua.com for more information about the new water research technology and a new Water Life Science® experience that awaits you.

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Bikers Beware of Winter Eye Dangers

24 Feb

Sharon Kleyne and Philip Paden, MD, put together a list of recommendations for protecting against winter dry eye.

Paden is an ophthalmologist and a former instructor at Cornell University. He is also a former professional motorcycle racer who has been riding for 40 years and is an authority on motorcycle eye protection and motorcycle dry eye.

According to Kleyne and Paden, motorcycle dry eye primarily occurs when wind increases the pressure on water at or near the surface of the eyes and eyelids, to evaporate into the atmosphere. As a result of this moisture loss, riders frequently complain of eye irritation, discomfort or fatigue, blurred vision, watery eyes, headaches and feelings of stress. Sunglasses and face shields may not offer adequate eye protection because other dehydrating factors also play a role. The tear film that covers and protecting our eyes is 98% water.

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Preventing and Lessening Eye Injuries

13 Jun

Eye Protection and Emergency First Aid

Note: According to the Merriam-Webster Medical Dictionary (1995), “to injure” is defined as, “to impair the soundness of.” Based on this extremely broad definition, the term “eye injury,” as used by eye care and emergency professionals, can refer to conditions ranging from the mildly uncomfortable (soap in the eye or squinting due to air pollution) to catastrophic trauma (eye penetration by a foreign object).

Eyesight Threats.

” In an emergency, eyesight threats may arise from smoke, heat, dust, fumes, airborne chemicals and particles, perspiration into the tear film, tear gas and pepper spray, mechanical injuries and impact trauma from flying objects. Injuries from of these threats may often be prevented or lessened through good eye safety practices.

” Eyesight threats may also be present in non-emergency situations. They could be caused by cleaning fluid fumes, auto exhaust, slicing onions, prolonged computer use, perspiration into the tear film, an eyelash in the eye, home shop accidents, and even insulated windows and walls and forced-air heating and cooling (which can be dehydrating to the eye’s protective tear film). These injuries may also be prevented or mitigated with good eye safety practices.

” Unprotected exposure to these eyesight threats could result in consequences ranging from mild eye discomfort to serious and permanent eye damage. Symptoms could include blurred or impaired vision, pain, dehydration (dry eye), eye strain; burning, itchy or watery eyes; eye diseases and serious physical injury (catastrophic trauma). Symptoms may be mild (sub-acute) or temporarily disorienting, or they could result in permanent eye damage and eyesight impairment or loss.

Eye Protection and First Aid.

  • Remember that in an emergency such as a burning building, impaired eyesight from dust, smoke, fumes or perspiration, could make it more difficult or impossible to get out and could cost you your life.
  • Healthy, well hydrated eyes will serve you far better in an emergency. It pays to educate yourself about eye care and practice good eye health on a daily basis.
  • Before engaging in an activity where eye injuries could occur, always:
    • Know what to do in an emergency.
    • Have a predetermined emergency first aid plan for eye and other injuries.
    • Follow good safety precautions and procedures.
    • Have emergency first aid materials available.
  • The best way to prevent eye injuries, especially from foreign objects and harmful substances, is to wear protective eyewear when in high risk situations. If you have corrective lenses, you are less likely to have an accident if you wear them.
  • Chronically dehydrated eyes, which lack sufficient moisture (water) in the protective overlying tear film, are more susceptible to certain eye injuries than fully hydrated eyes.

Specific Situations.

Fumes, smoke, tear gas, pepper spray, airborne chemicals. These conditions can make it difficult or impossible to see in an emergency and may cause permanent damage. They can also create discomfort by altering the tear film’s pH (acidity/alkalinity), osmolarity (moisture attracting ability) and moisture content. Protective eyewear helps shield eyes from certain airborne irritants. Should discomfort become extreme, irrigate eyes with a sterile eye wash spray such as Bio Med Wash, other eye wash devices, or water from a plumbed eyewash station.

Chemical or thermal burns to eyes, eyelids or skin. Spray or irrigate eyes with copious amounts of water or liquid (Bio Med Wash spray, other eye wash devices or a plumbed eyewash station). Do not blot burned areas unless caused by a chemical, such as pepper spray or tear gas that will continue to burn unless removed. If injury is severe, bandage and seek immediate medical assistance. Keep burned areas moist by spraying with a water mist. (Note: Some chemical eye washes may compound the negative effect of harmful chemicals.)

Perspiration and sunburn. Solar exposure is dehydrating to both eyes and skin and could increase perspiration run-off into the eyes, thus increasing the tear film’s salt concentration and causing discomfort. Sunburn is extremely dehydrating to eyes, and to eyelid skin that protects the eyes. Drink plenty of water during extended solar exposure or during situations that make you perspire. Water with added salt is best (a Gatorade type drink). The amount of needed water increases with temperature and activity level, but eight glasses per day are recommended. Moisturize eyes and skin with a water eye and facial mist and by drinking plenty of water.

Foreign objects (catastrophic trauma). For small objects such as sand or metal filings, irrigate and flush the affected eye with copious amounts of water, from either an all-water eye spray, plumbed eyewash station or other eye wash system, until the object(s) is removed. If there is (or if you suspect) penetration, severe pain, profuse watering or corneal scratching, bandage the eye and seek medical attention. Do not try to wash out particles that have penetrated the corneal membrane.

Contact lenses. For most eye injuries, if there is a contact lens in the eye, leave it place while flushing, irrigating or bandaging. Remove the lens only when first aid treatment is completed and the eye begins to feel normal.

Eye strain, stress, fatigue and allergies can cause body, eyes and skin to lose moisture and cause eye discomfort. Moisturize the eyes with a water mist and by drinking plenty of water.

Low humidity, heat, cold and wind increase moisture evaporation from the body’s external surfaces (eyes, skin, breathing passages) causing skin chapping, eye discomfort, dry eye, etc. Low humidity may become an eye threat in both warm and cold weather. Moisturize the eyes with a water mist and by drinking plenty of water.

© 2011 Bio-Logic Aqua Research All Rights Reserved

Eye Safety at Work

22 Mar

The potential for eye injuries varies with the job. If you work as a logger, the chances of getting a wood chip or a stick in your eye is high and you should always wear a hard hat and wrap-around protective lenses. If you work in a battery factory, or any other factory, or in construction, the chances of injury are also high and the need for eye protection and first aid knowledge are great. Even if you work in an office, you run the risk, however slim, of poking a pencil or fingernail in your eye.

Some workplaces, such as chemical factories, are required by law to have eye wash stations installed at specified intervals. These can be plumbed stations, which shoot water into the eyes like a drinking fountain, or any of several other devices that shoot a continuous jet of water, saline solution or chemical wash into the eyes.

Continue reading

Vision Care Tips for Truckers

4 Feb
  1. Smoking while driving is especially unhealthy because of the confined space. It addition to damaging lungs and heart, cigarette smoke is extremely irritating to eyes – even with a window opened – making it much harder to pay attention.
  2. Drink plenty of water while driving to keep your body alert and your eyes moist. Luke-warm water is less likely to make you have to go to the bathroom.
  3. Sunglasses, obviously, can help reduce road glare.
  4. Eat foods with high water content, and easily digested foods (salads, fruit, carrots, celery, etc.). Avoid sugar, salt and grease that can give you a lift followed by a let-down. Continue reading

Road-Bleary Eyes

8 Dec

It happens to everybody. You’re driving your car on a long road trip and suddenly your eyes start burning and you can’t keep them opened. You start nodding off, and sensing imminent disaster, you quickly pull off the road and take a nap. In an hour or so, you continue on your way, feeling much better.

But what would you do if you were an airline pilot and that happened? Or a tank driver during a war? Or an ambulance driver rushing to the hospital?

Actually, the cause may not be fatigue. Often, the cause is a reduction in the moisture content of the delicate tear film covering the external surface of your eyeballs. Pollution, heat, fatigue, car air-conditioning, and intense concentration (with not enough blinking), can all cause tear film moisture loss. Loss of tear film moisture increases the concentration of salts and other natural substances resulting in the familiar burning sensation. When you take a nap, your eyes are closed and your body is able to restore the depleted moisture.

The solution: Get plenty of rest, drink plenty of water (which will also help assure that you pull over and rest occasionally), make sure you blink often enough, and keep a pH Balanced water mist spray nearby as you drive.