Archive | April, 2012

Computer Vision Syndrome and Computer Eye Strain

20 Apr

Benefits of Eye Misting for Computer Dry Eye

We know what you’re doing right now!

You’re looking at a computer screen, aren’t you?

And chances are, your eyes are not happy about it!

Computers and dry eye symptoms.

  • Dry eye discomfort from computer use is a growing and increasingly urgent problem.
  • Ophthalmologists call this “computer vision syndrome” (CVS), “computer eye strain,” “computer eye irritation” or “computer dry eye.”
  • The computer dry eye problem is widespread, and potentially serious.
  • Nearly every computer user experiences dry eye discomfort that could lead to loss of productivity, loss of income, and eventually, loss of eyesight

Do you have computer vision syndrome?

If you answer “yes” to question #1 and at least two others, you may be experiencing computer vision syndrome.

  • Are you a “Computer Nerd” who uses a computer more than two hours a day?
  • Do your eyes sometimes burn or itch?
  • Are your eyes sometimes sensitive to light?
  • Does your vision ever become blurry?
  • Do your eyelids sometimes become heavy or tired during computer use, even though you’ve had plenty of sleep?
  • Do you get headaches from using the computer?
  • Do your shoulders sometimes feel tight while using the computer?
  • Do you have frequent eye allergies?

Other causes of computer vision syndrome:

In addition to computers, several common office conditions could result in computer eye strain, tear film dehydration and dry eye symptoms.

  • Forced-air heating and cooling.
  • Synthetic chemicals (plastics, paint, cleaning fluids, etc).
  • Insulated windows and walls.
  • Fluorescent lighting.
  • Stress.
  • Low indoor humidity.
  • Your diet.

Your eyes depend on the tear film.

  • The highly complex “tear film” covering the eyes consist of water, oil, electrolyte, antibodies, protein and mucus. The tear film moistens, lubricates, oxygenates and protects the eyes; and forms a light transmitting surface that enables you to see.
  • The tear film is 98% water. Every time you open your eyelids, you expose the tear film to evaporation and natural water loss.
  • Dry eye symptoms occur when too much water evaporates from the tear film without replacement (this process is highly complex, also involving tear glands and brain messaging).
  • More dry eye education
  • More tear film education
  • Computers accelerate tear film dehydration and water evaporation because:
    • They create or reflect glare and intensely bright light.
    • They are almost always indoors, which tends to be less humid than outdoors.
    • They cause a decreased blink rate (blinking replenishes the tear film), which may drop from 30-40 times a minute to three times a minute.
    • They contribute to brain and body stress, which is dehydrating.
  • To re-hydrate dry eyes, simply add water to the dehydrated tear film!
    • Formulated eye drops are inconvenient to apply, excessively large in volume, contain little natural water and are not always effective.
    • Nature’s Tears EyeMist instantly and conveniently replaces lost tear film water.

Nature’s Tears EyeMist.

To supplement tear film water and minimize dry eye symptoms, mist your eyes frequently with Nature’s Tears EyeMist. With no dosage limit, all-natural Nature’s Tears EyeMist may be applied whenever computer dry eye symptoms are experienced. Always keep Nature’s Tears EyeMist beside your computer (and combine it with a complete daily hydration program that includes drinking 8-10 glasses of water a day).

Computer vision syndrome prevention tips:

  • An eye care professional may prescribe special “computer glasses.”
  • Keep a glass of water (And Nature’s Tears EyeMist) near your desk to help humidify the air.
  • Drink bottled water while you work…but pour it into a glass first. Total daily water intake should be at least 8 to 10 glasses.
  • Make a conscious effort to blink more often.
  • Several times per hour, look around the room at objects of varying distances.
  • Take scheduled breaks away from your desk (outdoors if possible).
  • To reduce glare, position your computer so windows are at the side of your computer rather than in the front or back. Adjust window blinds accordingly.
  • If possible, turn off fluorescent overhead lights and switch to a desk lamp.
  • Attach a glare-blocking hood or filter to your monitor.
  • Crack a window to let in humid air from the outside. Outdoor air is free of re-circulated bacteria and shed skin particles from co-workers, which enters via the heating/cooling system and can cause eye and skin dehydration.
  • Set the REFRESH RATE on your monitor as high as you can (over 85). Use a flat-screen if possible. A low refresh rate (60 or less), on a cathode ray monitor, can cause dry eye, eye strain and headache.
  • Take a shower every day that allow plenty of steam and water to penetrate your eyes, skin, breathing passages and lungs.
  • Every couple weeks, take a long, luxuriant hot body bath with a cup of Epsom salt dissolved in the bathtub water. This will detoxify, lubricate and humidify dry eyes and skin, improve skin flexibility and benefit all part of the body.
  • Keep your body fit: Reduce stress, establish a daily program of sleep, fresh air and exercise, control your weight, avoid sugar (which is dehydrating) and eat lots of dark green leafy vegetables (eye food).

The Dangers of Pet Dry Eye

9 Apr

“Dry eye in humans is often environmentally related and has become the number one reason for United States eye doctor visits. Pets are subject to the same environmental conditions and are far more prone to eye injuries and diseases, including cat and dog dry eye. As a pet “parent,” monitoring your dog or cat’s eye health is critical. Eyes should always be kept moist and, of course, you must make sure your dog or cat eats properly and drinks enough water.”

Sharon Kleyne, syndicated radio talk show host*

The state of eye care in pets.

According to Animal Eye Care, which runs 39 ophthalmology clinics for pets, dogs and cats are subject to numerous eye diseases. The list on their website includes blepharitis, eye injuries, cataracts, conjunctivitis, corneal ulcers, eyelid masses and glaucoma.

Sharon Kleyne, entrepreneur, water and health advocate, and host of the Sharon Kleyne Hour -Power of Water syndicated radio talk show, points out that nearly all of these eye diseases are either the result of pet dry eye (a disease characterized by insufficient water content in the protective natural tear film covering the eye), or have pet dry eye as a side effect (Pet dry eye often results from diet and/or medication).

She reiterates what many veterinarians are discovering – that treatment of these diseases will be far more effective if you simultaneously treat for cat or dog dry eye.

Cat and dog dry eye.

Sharon Kleyne’s research has discovered that eye dehydration and dry eye disease among humans are more widespread than commonly reported (nearly every human suffers from occasional dry eye symptoms and it usually goes undiagnosed). “If dry eye is under-diagnosed among humans,” says Mrs. Kleyne, “the condition is almost unrecognized among professional pet care experts – despite the fact that the incidence of dry eye may be even greater among dogs and cats than among humans.”

“The good news,” according to Mrs. Kleyne, “is that there are many ways pet owners can be proactive in monitoring their pet’s eyes to keep them hydrated and healthy.

(Note: Because of the “third eyelid” membrane, a normal dog or cat eye is slightly better protected and better moisturized than a human eye. But because pets are exposed to far more high risk situations, their eyes are more subject to injuries and infections.)

Dry eye symptoms

Pet dry eye in is closely linked to conjunctivitis, red eye, blepharitis (eyelid inflammation) and corneal ulcers. Symptoms may include: (1) redness of the white part of the eye, (2) eyelid inflammation, (3) frequent eye infections and dripping, (4) lack of “shine” in the eyes or a noticeable thickening or unevenness of the tear film’s usually invisible lipid (oil) component, (5) indications of eye discomfort such as frequent squinting, blinking or pawing at the eyes, (6) unusual dryness of the fur and/or mouth.

Environmental risk factors include; (1) living in an extremely dry or desert climate, (2) frequent exposure to wind, cold and solar radiation, (3) frequent exposure to dirt (very common among dogs), dust, smoke or chemical fumes, (4) prolonged exposure to climate controlled indoor environments such as forced-air heating and cooling and insulated walls and windows.

High risk dog breeds: bulldogs, cocker spaniels, lhasa apsos and west highland white terriers.

Suggestions for pet eye care, including cat and dog dry eye.

  • Control exposure to high risk situations.
  • Inspect your pet’s eyes frequently, watching for symptoms described above and for symptoms of other eye diseases.
  • See your veterinarian if your pet shown any symptoms of any eye disease, including dry eye.
  • For mostly indoor pets, make sure their home is well-humidified. Open windows, have lots of plants around, set out bowls of water or purchase a room humidifier.
  • Make sure your pet is well nourished and drinks enough water every day.
  • Apply Nature’s Tears EyeMist several times a day to maintain natural tear film water content and also to keep fur well hydrated. This routine can prevent or alleviate dry eye and help reduce dry eye as a side effect of other diseases.

Suggestions for pet watering.

Pets vary in the amount of water they like to drink and getting them to drink more can be a challenge. Do not assume that they will drink the exact right amount of water “by instinct.”

  • Pets should drink one cup of water per day for every 10 pounds of weight.
  • Follow the recommended diet for your pet’s species, age, weight, state of health and lifestyle.
  • Water sitting in a bowl all day can become contaminated and also lose oxygen and therefore taste.
  • Change water bowl frequently or purchase a pet watering device.
  • Don’t let pets drink from puddles or lakes.
  • Add water to your pet’s food.
  • Offer them water occasionally – especially after activity.
  • Pets require more water if they are ill.

*Don’t miss the Sharon Kleyne Hour – Power of Water Mondays at 10 a.m. PST/PDT. The syndicated show may be heard on Voice America/World Talk Radio, Green Talk Radio and Apple iTunes. Go to http://www.SharonKleyneHour.com for summaries and replays of past shows.

Online Sources:

WebMD for pets, PetMD, Animal Eye Care, Free Drinking Water, eHow, Hugs Pet Products..

© 2011 Bio-Logic Aqua Research All Rights Reserved

Tips to Prevent Computer Eye Strain and Computer Dry Eye

6 Apr

Since March, 2007, the Sharon Kleyne Hour Power of Water radio talk show has interviewed numerous guests who offered tips to prevent “computer eye strain” (also called “computer vision syndrome,” “CVS,” or computer eye strain). Symptoms are experienced by a surprisingly large percentage of people who work at computers.

Computer eye strain and dry eye symptoms should never be ignored. Dry eye symptoms could lead to chronic dry eye, eyelid inflammation, corneal ulceration, impaired vision and numerous eye diseases. Symptoms include red, burning and itchy eyes, blurred vision, eye twitching, headaches and impaired sleep.

Vision care experts agree that the #1 tip to prevent or minimize computer eye strain is educating yourself about the problem. The #2 tip is taking personal responsibility to proactively implement the eye care tips described below.

The #3 tip for keeping eyes all-naturally wet, moist and humid is to always have Nature’s Tears® EyeMist® near your computer. Apply as often as desired without the inconvenience of eye drops (Eye drops, applied too frequently, can flood and wash away the eye’s natural tear film. See http://www.naturestears.com and click on “Dry Eye”). Nature’s Tears EyeMist, a personal hand-held eye humidifying device, is all-natural tissue culture water, pH balanced and 100% safe.

Tips to prevent and minimize computer eye strain.

In addition to preventing computer eye strain and dry eye, many of these tips help prevent other computer related conditions such as gout, allergies, carpal tunnel syndrome and weight gain (abdominal swelling).

  • Keep an all natural, 100% water eye mist beside your computer. Whenever you feel eye discomfort, mist the air in front of your eyes for two seconds. Sharon Kleyne recommends Nature’s Tears EyeMist for this, available on http://www.Amazon.com or http://www.naturestears.com.
  • Drink eight to ten glasses of water a day and drink water from a glass while you work.
  • Keep a bowl of water or a plant near your desk to humidify the air. Crack a window to let in fresh, humid air from the outdoors (forced-air heating and cooling re-circulates dehydrating bacteria and skin flora).
  • “Eye Healthy” diet choices include dark green leafy vegetables (spinach, kale, arugula, broccoli leaves), foods with omega-3 fatty acids (fish and flaxseed oil) and carrots.
  • While working, avoid dehydrating substances such as alcohol, coffee, energy drinks, refined sugar products and cigarette smoke.
  • Avoid staying up late at night on the computer if you will be working at a computer in the morning.
  • Several times per hour, to relax and exercise your eyes, look around the room at objects of varying distances. Take scheduled breaks away from your desk, outdoors if possible.
  • Make a conscious effort to maintain your blink rate (computer use can drop your reflexive blink rate from 30 to three times a minute). Tape the word “BLINK” on your monitor. The more you blink, the moister your eyes.
  • Position your chair as high as possible with respect to the monitor. The resultant lowering of eyelids can drastically reduce tear film moisture evaporation.
  • To reduce screen glare, position your computer so windows are at the sides rather than in front or back. Adjust window blinds so bright sunlight is away from screen and eyes. If possible, turn off fluorescent lights and use a less intense desk lamp.
  • An eye care professional may prescribe special “computer glasses” or, for severe dry eye, moisture retaining eyeglass lenses.
  • Wear sunglasses outdoors – solar radiation dehydrates the eyes.
  • If you have a cathode tube monitor, consider attaching a glare-blocking hood or filter to the screen and set the “Refresh Rate” as high as you can (over 85).
  • Take daily showers with plenty of steam and moisture penetrating eyes, skin and breathing passages. An occasional hot body bath with a cup of Epsom salt. Will benefit eyes and eyelids and reduces stress.
  • Avoid stress and get adequate sleep and fresh air exercise. Poor sleep and elevated stress can be dehydrating and cause dry eye symptoms.

Sharon Kleyne Hour Power of Water.

Listen to the Sharon Kleyne Hour Power of Water Mondays, 10 a.m., PST/PDT. The syndicated talk show is heard on Voice America/World Talk Radio, Green Talk Network and Apple iTunes. Go to http://www.SharonKleyneHour.com for podcasts of past shows or written summaries. Also visit http://www.naturestears.com, whatistheeye.wordpress.com, “Nature’s Tears EyeMist” on Facebook and “Bio-Logic Aqua” on Twitter. Sponsored by Nature’s Tears EyeMist.

© 2011 Bio-Logic Aqua Research